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EECA’s measures for improving household energy efficiency to 2022

EECA has defined specific measures to assess progress towards greater energy efficiency in our housing stock over the next four years.

Optimising New Zealanders’ use of renewable energy through energy efficient homes, technologies and behaviours is one of the cornerstone strategies in EECA’s recently-published Statement of Intent, which sets out the agency’s strategic direction to 2022.

Progress will be judged against four measures:

  • a relative decrease in peak electricity demand in relation to average energy demand
  • a decrease in energy use of residential appliances per capita
  • an increase in energy savings per annum from improvements in the electricity efficiency of household products through minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) and mandatory energy performance labelling (MEPL)
  • a decrease in the percentage of people reporting that lack of information is a barrier to taking action on energy efficiency.

In its 2018 Statement of Intent, EECA also estimated that more than $470 million could be saved each year by improving the quality and energy efficiency of New Zealand’s housing stock.

“While the residential sector only accounts for 6% of New Zealand’s total energy-related emissions…households have a significant impact on our peak electricity use when electricity tends to be at its least renewable and most expensive to produce (for example, winter evenings).”

The focus areas in the new document align with the New Zealand Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy (2017−2022), New Zealand’s commitments under the Paris Agreement on Climate Change and the 2050 target of a net-zero emissions economy.

You can find more details here.

 

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No housebuilding peak in sight

Housebuilding nationally is in a long growth phase with no peak forecast in the next 6 years.

The National Construction Pipeline Report 2018, released at the end of July, forecasts national building and construction activity up to 31 December 2023.

By 2023:

  • National dwelling consents are expected to exceed historic highs at 43,000 per annum.
  • Over 220,000 dwellings are expected to be consented between 2018 and 2023.
  • New Zealand’s total construction value (which has been just under $37b for each of the last two years) is forecast to grow to $41b. Much of the growth will come 2021–2023.
  • Auckland is forecast to have the largest residential building growth by value, increasing by 33% to reach over $10b in 2023.
  • Wellington, the smallest region by residential building value, is expected to see the strongest percentage growth, increasing 65% from $1.5b per annum in 2017 to $2.5b in 2023. (Wellington experienced the strongest total construction growth – 11% – in 2017.)


For the first time since the report was initiated in 2013 a peak in total construction value is not expected within the forecast period. Instead a more moderate sustained growth is forecast for the next six years.

The residential building and dwelling forecasts used do not differentiate between KiwiBuild and non-KiwiBuild dwelling construction.

The National Construction Pipeline Report was commissioned by the Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment (MBIE) and jointly prepared by BRANZ and Pacifecon.

The 2018 report together with earlier reports can be found here.

 

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Solar installations heading towards 20,000

New Zealand is close to passing the milestone where over 20,000 homes have solar power generation systems installed.

The publication Electricity in New Zealand, recently updated by the Electricity Authority, reports that there were around 18,000 residential connections with installed solar generation at 31 March 2018. Considering the pace of new installations, over 20,000 homes will shortly be generating power from photovoltaic systems.

The installed capacity by 31 March was about 62 MW (up from an estimated 43 MW in mid-2016 and just 8.2 MW in late 2013). As a proportion of total generation it is still very small – around 0.2 percent in 2017.

One big reason explaining the growth of solar installations is greater affordability. The installation cost of solar panel systems in New Zealand fell 75 percent in the 10 years to 2018.

Other sources of renewable energy generation include hydro, geothermal and wind. There is currently around 700 MW of large-scale wind generation available, supplying around five percent of the country’s electricity needs.

Around 85 percent of total generation is from renewable sources, a figure that is steadily increasing. The government has a target of 100 percent renewable energy output (in years with normal hydro inflows) by 2035.

You can download of copy of Electricity in New Zealand here.

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Solar installations heading towards 20,000

New Zealand is close to passing the milestone where over 20,000 homes have solar power generation systems installed.

The publication Electricity in New Zealand, recently updated by the Electricity Authority, reports that there were around 18,000 residential connections with installed solar generation at 31 March 2018. Considering the pace of new installations, over 20,000 homes will shortly be generating power from photovoltaic systems.

The installed capacity by 31 March was about 62 MW (up from an estimated 43 MW in mid-2016 and just 8.2 MW in late 2013). As a proportion of total generation it is still very small – around 0.2 percent in 2017.

One big reason explaining the growth of solar installations is greater affordability. The installation cost of solar panel systems in New Zealand fell 75 percent in the 10 years to 2018.

Other sources of renewable energy generation include hydro, geothermal and wind. There is currently around 700 MW of large-scale wind generation available, supplying around five percent of the country’s electricity needs.

Around 85 percent of total generation is from renewable sources, a figure that is steadily increasing. The government has a target of 100 percent renewable energy output (in years with normal hydro inflows) by 2035.

You can download of copy of Electricity in New Zealand here.